Elk & Antelope Fried Schnitzel

Elk Schnitzel
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Schnitzel is traditionally made with veal, chicken and other meats, but why not try it with elk, venison or antelope. It’s a simple recipe that tends to keep the meat very tender when cooked and really tastes amazing with some fresh thyme and romano cheese. Serve alongside spaghetti or spaghetti squash and your favorite tomato sauce. Don’t forget to squeeze a little lemon juice over the top of each Schnitzel. Enjoy.

Servings 2-3

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 lb elk loin or round steak (substitute antelope or venison)
  • 1 cup sifted flour
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 1/2 cup breadcrumbs
  • 2 tablespoons fresh thyme
  • 2 tablespoons Romano or Parmesan Cheese
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • salt and pepper (optional)
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 2 tablespoons canola oil
  • Lemon Slices

DIRECTIONS

  1. Cut meat loin into 1/2 inch slices. Place meat into a Ziploc bag and gently pound until 1/4 inch thick. Season with garlic powder, salt and pepper. Let stand until room temperature for 30 minutes.
  2. Combine breadcrumbs, fresh thyme and cheese on a plate. Sift flour on a separate plate. Blend 2 eggs in a third bowl.
  3. Using a cast-iron skillet or non-stick pan heat oil and butter to medium-high.
  4. Coat elk slices in flour, then dip in egg mixture allowing excess to drip off and then coat in breadcrumbs on each side. Cook breaded meat in oil and butter being careful not to over crowd the skillet. When meat is browned on one side, about 3-4 minutes, turn and brown on the other side. Remove, set aside and cook the remaining meat.

Serve with a squeeze of lemon and fresh grated cheese. This recipe pairs well with spaghetti or spaghetti squash and tomato sauce.

Elk Schnitzel

Gently pound meat in a Ziploc bag until 1/4 inch thick

Elk Schnitzel

Cook breaded meat until browned on one side about 3-4 minutes. Turn and continue to cook until done, about 3-4 minutes.

Elk Schnitzel

Elk Fried Schnitzel with fresh thyme and Romano cheese


Yum

Fried Antelope Schnitzel

Substitute Antelope backstrap and crushed whole grain crackers for breadcrumbs.

1 Comment

  • Reply March 12, 2017

    scott

    Great recipe! I found the pieces didn’t need quite as long to cook and would imagine it could vary significantly based on exact temperature of stove/oil, exact thickness of pieces, etc. So, my advice to anyone trying this would be, first, make sure your pieces have uniform thickness, and then, try one or two pieces to see how much time is right before putting a whole bunch of pieces in.

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